Winners of the International Ibsen Award

The International Ibsen Award honours an individual, institution or organization that has brought new artistic dimensions to the world of drama or theater. It is awarded every two years.


2016

Forced Entertainment

The British theatre group Forced Entertainment is the winner of the 2016 International Ibsen Award. It was announced on a press conference at the National Theatre in Oslo the 18th March 2016.

2014

Peter Handke

Peter Handke is the winner of the 2014 International Ibsen Award. It was announced on a press conference at the National Theatre in Oslo the 20th March 2014.

2012

Heiner Goebbels

Heiner Goebbels was the winner of the 2012 International Ibsen Award. The award ceremony took place during the Ibsen Festival at the National Theatre in Oslo on the 8th September 2012.

2010

Jon Fosse

The 2010 International Ibsen Award was given to the Norwegian playwright Jon Fosse. Jon Fosse is hard to play and has engendered a host of suggested, more or less successful interpretations. Still, there is a growing group of directors and actors of all ages who see him as a liberating voice in a sphere where the spectacular and overly obvious gains ground. As all important writers of drama, Fosse forces the theatre and its audiences to think in new ways. He is the poet of the unknown.

2009

Ariane Mnouchkine

The 2009 International Ibsen Award was given to the French director Ariane Mnouchkine. Mnouchkine gathers people around her in order to tell stories of the great crises of civilisation, of long-ago battles and the persecution and desperation of refugees in our own time. Out of these tales of crisis and tragedy grows a strong, many would say utopian, community of experience between actors and audience, challenging our comfortable illusions.

2008

Peter Brook

Peter Brook was the first person to win the International Ibsen Award. The 2008 International Ibsen Award was given to Peter Brook for his successful demonstration that all significant theatre has a unique ability to bring people together, that culture is something everyone can appreciate, and that no group or nation can claim ownership of a work of literature, either in the form of words or as performed on stage.